Antimony trisulfide versus antimony sulfide

Orin2017

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Feb 2020
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I have been reading about friction/impact compositions involving antimony sulfide and potassium chlorate. Since I don’t have any Antimony Sulfide but I do have Antimony TriSulfide, I was wondering if antimony trisufide could be interchangeable with antimony sulfide. Or substituted? Anyone know?
 

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Orin2017

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Feb 2020
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Is this a stupid question, or what? I got no responses. Is antimony sulfide the same thing as antimony trisulfide? Or just another name for it? Anyone know?
 

wrtiii

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Apr 2019
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71
OK:

#1, they're chemically the same thing. Antimony's valence means that its "sulfide" is two antimony atoms and 3 sulfur atoms (trisulfide).

#2, if you are asking such an elementary question on a board like this (as opposed to one of the boards such as fireworking.com where you will find the serious pyro manufacturing community), and being a little churlish when nobody answers, you should not be messing around with this! It's quite toxic on its own, and requires protective gear - respirator, gloves, protective clothing. For pyrotechnic use, it's specifically not to be mixed with chlorates or the mixture may self-ignite. Even with perchlorates, the mixture is extremely sensitive.

#3, if you are going to pursue this anyway, don't do it where anyone else is exposed to your chems or any fire or explosions that may result (definitely not a basement or garage activity); make sure your will is drawn up; and check that your life insurance is paid up and has the correct beneficiaries. I'm completely serious about this, it's the best advice I can give you.
 
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Orin2017

Member
Joined
Feb 2020
Messages
17
OK:

#1, they're chemically the same thing. Antimony's valence means that its "sulfide" is two antimony atoms and 3 sulfur atoms (trisulfide).

#2, if you are asking such an elementary question on a board like this (as opposed to one of the boards such as fireworking.com where you will find the serious pyro manufacturing community), and being a little churlish when nobody answers, you should not be messing around with this! It's quite toxic on its own, and requires protective gear - respirator, gloves, protective clothing. For pyrotechnic use, it's specifically not to be mixed with chlorates or the mixture may self-ignite. Even with perchlorates, the mixture is extremely sensitive.

#3, if you are going to pursue this anyway, don't do it where anyone else is exposed to your chems or any fire or explosions that may result (definitely not a basement or garage activity); make sure your will is drawn up; and check that your life insurance is paid up and has the correct beneficiaries. I'm completely serious about this, it's the best advice I can give you.

1. Churlish? You are going to make me have to google the definition of churlish!
2. If you want to know what I felt, I felt embarrassed and unwelcomed. Referring me to a different site for dummies cubes the effect of that jab.
3. I’m glad that the materials are the same. It is odd that Chinese antimony “trisulfide” is sold so cheaply on amazon or ebay yet a 100 gram bottle of antimony “sulfide” is so expensive.
4. Since I’m working in my garage and trying to produce pull string igniters and similar things, I’m aware of the dangers. But thanks.
5. Thanks for answering my initial question.
 

wrtiii

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Apr 2019
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71
Out of curiosity, I just took a quick look to see why the prices would vary. The expensive stuff is much purer than the cheaper stuff, that's all. The cheaper stuff will likely have some arsenic and other (toxic) heavy metals mixed in.

Fireworking.com is not at all a site for dummies - it's where you will find many of the really serious pyro manufacturers hanging out. If I wanted to produce pull string igniters, I'd start by searching then asking for advice there.
 

MHPyro

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Fireworking.com is not at all a site for dummies - it's where you will find many of the really serious pyro manufacturers hanging out. If I wanted to produce pull string igniters, I'd start by searching then asking for advice there.

I think he was referring to me.

This forum is clearly not very active and is geared more towards anything but manufacturing so I figured the right person didn't see the post yet. I know nothing of the subject and didn't think posting a link to something that may help would be insulting.
 
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